Living with Knee Osteoarthritis

Across the United States, an estimated 32.5 million adults in the United States are dealing with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Furthermore, about half of people will develop knee osteoarthritis at some point in their lifetime.

If you’re one of the many people living with knee osteoarthritis right now, you have treatment options. At the Center for Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine, Michael L. Blackwell, MD, and his experienced care team provide support for their patients in and around Shenandoah, Texas, who are living with knee osteoarthritis.

Here’s what Dr. Blackwell wants you to know about your treatment options for knee osteoarthritis. With the right approach, you can reduce discomfort and maintain your quality of life, even with knee osteoarthritis.

Chronic knee inflammation

Arthritis is a chronic inflammatory condition, one that can be controlled and managed, but not cured. There are several major types of arthritis, including osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). 

OA most commonly shows up in middle age, typically in patients starting at age 50. However, arthritis can also strike at any point in your life. Some types of arthritis even result from trauma or an accident.

When you have OA, your immune system attacks your own joints, resulting in symptoms like swelling, stiffness, and pain. OA in your knees can make it difficult to get around, disrupting many facets of your life. 

You might find yourself struggling to manage even everyday activities, like going for a walk or climbing a single flight of stairs.

Osteoarthritis causes degenerative damage to your joints. It develops as the cartilage that pads and cushions the moving bones in your knee joint wears down, leaving your bones to grind painfully against one another every time you shift the joint. 

Eventually, uncomfortable bone spurs can even start to form in your knee joint, increasing your pain and robbing you of more mobility.

Flexible treatment options for your OA

It’s encouraging to know, then, that you have access to a wide range of treatment options to cope with your OA symptoms. For patients with knee osteoarthritis, Dr. Blackwell typically recommends approaches including:

For severe cases of knee osteoarthritis, you might need surgical treatment to ease your pain and joint stiffness. Dr. Blackwell pursues conservative forms of treatment before turning to surgical options. 

If you need knee replacement surgery, however, Dr. Blackwell’s team uses the state-of-the-art Mako robotic-arm assisted technology to give you the best results.

To develop your unique treatment plan for knee osteoarthritis, Dr. Blackwell starts with a thorough physical exam and any needed diagnostic tests. You continue to receive ongoing support from the Center for Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine.

If you’re ready to get started reclaiming your freedom, mobility, and comfort this fall, contact the Center for Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine, with locations in Tomball and Kingwood, Texas, today. 

You can schedule an initial consultation with Dr. Blackwell and his team by calling now or using our online booking feature. You can also send a message to Dr. Blackwell and the team here on our website.

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